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What is LSD?


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Lysergic acid diethylamide, commonly referred to as
LSD, or “acid,” is considered the best known and most
researched psychedelic drug.i
LSD is active at
exceptionally small doses (around 20 micrograms) and
is taken orally, sometimes as droplets or more
commonly on blotter paper and absorbed on the
tongue and then swallowed.
LSD was discovered in 1938 by Albert Hofmann, a
Swiss chemist working at Sandoz Laboratories, who
later became the first person to experience the drug’s
psychoactive effects after he accidentally ingested a
small amount in 1943. The effects Hofmann reported
included, “restlessness, dizziness, a dreamlike state
and an extremely stimulated imagination.”ii
Sandoz sent samples of LSD to psychiatrists,
scientists, and mental health professionals around the
world for more research. For the next two decades,
thousands of experiments with LSD led to a better
understanding of how LSD affected consciousness by
interacting with the brain’s serotonin neurotransmitter
system.iii
Scientists considered psychedelics to be promising
treatments as an aid to therapy for a broad range of
psychiatric diagnoses, including alcoholism,
schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders, and
depression.iv Thousands of people were also
introduced to psychedelics as part of various religious
or spiritual practices, for mental and emotional
exploration, or to enhance wellness and creativity.
Recent results from epidemiological studies have
shown lower rates of mental health disorders and
suicide among people who have used psychedelics
like LSD.v,vi,vii
LSD is currently in Schedule I of the Controlled
Substances Act, the most heavily criminalized category
for drugs. Schedule I drugs are considered to have a
“high potential for abuse” and no currently accepted
medical use – though when it comes to LSD there is
significant evidence to the contrary on both counts.

What is the legal status of LSD?

Swiss scientist Albert Hofmann first created LSD in 1938 from lysergic acid, a chemical from the fungus ergot. Hofmann later discovered the drug’s hallucinogenic properties in 1943. Since 1971 the government lists LSD as a Schedule I drug, just like cannabis. This scheduling means that the DEA says LSD has a high potential for abuse with no known medical benefits. 

Such legal restrictions and therefore lack of research, have lead to mass misinformation about LSD. According to Mitchell Gomez, the executive director of DanceSafe, an organization predominantly known for their on-set testing sites at electronic music events, in their work to keep LSD and other psychedelic use as safe as possible, deprogramming inaccurate and outdated knowledge can be trickier than fighting harm caused by the substance itself. 

“We teach people how to be safer about their substance use, and maximize the benefits they get from their substance use, and educating the public about how many harms they associate with drug use is actually due to drug prohibition,” Gomez says. “Most of what we do is actually prohibition harm reduction, not drug harm reduction. These are harms that with legal, regulated markets would not be a concern.”

How many people use LSD?

LSD is considered one of the most well-known
psychedelics among people who use drugs nonmedically, but according to the Substance Abuse and
Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA),
which conducts the largest annual national survey on
drug use, its use is not at all common. The percentage
of psychedelic use is so low that several drugs are
grouped under the category of “hallucinogens,” which
includes LSD, PCP, peyote, mescaline, psilocybin
mushrooms, and “Ecstasy” or “Molly” (MDMA). In
each year between 2002 and 2014, an annual average
of 0.1% of people across all ages were considered to
be current psychedelic users (meaning they reported
use within 30 days of completing the survey). In 2014,
0.3% of the 16,875 adolescent respondents (12 to 17
year-olds) in the US were considered to be current
users of LSD, 0.3% of the 11,643 young adult
respondents (18 to 25), and 0.1% of 33,750 adult
respondents aged 26 or older.
However, when considering data from people reporting
lifetime use of psychedelics, rates were similar across
most age ranges, meaning just as many young adults
in the 21st century have used psychedelics as older
adults who lived through the 1960’s and 70’s.

Is LSD addictive?

LSD is not considered to be addictive nor does it
cause compulsive use.xlix One reason is that the
intense, long-lasting experience, which can be
physically and mentally challenging, may cause people
using LSD non-medically to limit their frequency of
use.i
Another reason is that the human body quickly
builds tolerance to LSD, such that users require much
higher doses after only a few days of repeated use,
making it extremely difficult to have any effect after
more than four days of repeated usage. And because
of the similar brain receptors involved in their effects,
cross-tolerance occurs with psilocybin and LSD, which
means that if someone takes psilocybin mushrooms
one day, the effects of taking LSD the next day will be
diminished.

Is LSD dangerous?

Experts agree that LSD is an extremely safe chemical. 

“In terms of physiological safety, there are very few things out there in the world that are as physiologically non-problematic as LSD. We don’t have a single documented physiological death from LSD ever,” Gomez says. “That includes people accidentally took upwards of 1000 doses.

Apparently the urban legend of someone consuming an entire bottle of liquid LSD is real.

Vakharia confirms that based on the research available, a very small portion of hallucinogenic drug users develop a substance use disorder. Of course, due to federal funding restrictions, we need more research. Most negative LSD experiences or injury come from what experts refer to as behavioral risks, as psychedelics can trigger pre-existing mental illness, in particular, according to Gomez, people with a family history of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.

Even if you don’t have any mental health concerns, our state of mind while taking LSD can color your experience. “Going through a bad time? Break-up? Maybe you don’t want to use LSD, it tends to bring out the demons,” says LSD user and photographer Pedro.

Does LSD interact with prescription medications?

If you’re one of the one in six Americans who takes prescription drugs, you may have read online forums with conflicting information on how SSRIs and other medications may or may not affect an LSD trip. Unfortunately, in addition to limited federal funding in general, when research is done on drugs like LSD, those with mental health issues are left out of the study. Still, the internet is dotted with users saying that an antidepressant affected their trip. 

“We do know that LSD works on serotonin neurotransmitters, so certain kinds of medications that people take are serotonin specific,” Vakharia says. “Given that LSD works on the same neurotransmitters, I would say that there will probably be potential for some interaction there. This is also me purely speculating.” Vakharia says. 

There is also the consideration that those experiencing an out of the ordinary trip while on mental health medication may actually be experiencing enhanced underlying conditions the pills treat.

“The claims of SSRIs causing an issue with LSD are not super well documented. I tend to think that a lot of those cases is just exacerbating existing mental illness. I’m personally very skeptical,” Gomez says. As we have so much anecdotal evidence of LSD improving mental well-being, it would be rad if the government allocated funds to get to the bottom of this.

“I think the scheduling of LSD and other drugs have been really unfortunate for people who want to do research and learn more about these substances,” Vakharia says. “It creates these undue barriers for researchers who want to learn more and do this work.” 

So in addition to tripping well by reviewing your medical history, mood, setting and snagging a testing kit, stay abreast of your local laws to help more US citie broaden their laws surrounding psychedelics. A reluctance to change with the times not only hinders individuals, but the Universe at large.

“There is great research coming out of Switzerland and different parts of the world so it also puts the US behind. If we make it hard for researchers to do this work, we’re also not at the cutting edge, and I think that’s a shame for everyone,” Vakharia says.

Can LSD and other psychedelics be used as
medicine or therapy?

Yes. Fully legal research programs in the mid-20th
century that involved tens of thousands of patients
found that carefully monitored and controlled use of
LSD may be beneficial for many psychiatric disorders,
personal and spiritual development, and creative
enhancement for healthy people. However, after LSD
was banned in 1970, clinical research to evaluate its
medical safety and efficacy was effectively halted until
the late 90s and early 2000s.
Today, there are more than a dozen studies taking
place to evaluate the medical safety and efficacy of
psychedelics, including LSD. Although much of the
early LSD research did not stand up to today’s
standards, as they often lacked a placebo control
group or double-blinding procedures (in which neither
the subject of the research nor the investigators knew
whether the subject received LSD or placebo).
Nevertheless, their promising findings have been
revisited and spurred a resurgence of new, more
rigorous research on the potential benefits of
psychedelics as a treatment for cluster headache,
anxiety, addiction to alcohol and other drugs,
and depression, as well as neuroimaging
experiments furthering the understanding of its effects
on the brain.

What are the long term health impacts of LSD?

The risks associated with psychedelic drugs are mostly
psychological, not physical. Physically, LSD is
considered to be one of the least toxic drugs.xlii
Although lethal doses have been determined from
experiments in several animal models,xliii there has
never been a recorded case of death exclusively
attributed to LSD in humans.i
Physical effects are minor but can be varied from
person to person. The most consistent reactions, such
as dilated pupils, elevated blood pressure, and
increased heart rate, are usually mild, and considered
side effects of emotional intensification. However,
these, along with other reported symptoms like
nausea, increased perspiration, numbing and tremors,
can sometimes make psychological symptoms like
anxiety, panic attacks, paranoia, and mood swings
seem worse. Long-term physical effects directly
attributed to the pharmacology of LSD are rare, and
research suggests they may also be due to latent
psychological disorders

What are the short term effects of LSD?

The effects of psychedelic drugs like LSD are difficult
to categorize – they affect different people, at different
places, and at different times, with incredible
variability.
However, LSD and other psychedelics are known for
their profound changes in consciousness and
perception. LSD’s effects last around 8-10 hours, with
peak effects occurring 4-6 hours after ingestion. These
effects include sensory enhancement, sense of time
changing (minutes can feel like hours), real or
imagined objects appear to be moving (flowing
patterns and shapes) both with eyes open or closed,
unusual thoughts and speech, personal insight and
reflection, and excited mood.

Individual reactions to these perceptual changes are
very much based on set and setting. Set (or
“mindset”) refers to the psychological state and the
beliefs of the person taking the drug. Setting is the
external circumstances they’re in – the people around
them and their environmental surroundings.

Can taking LSD in low doses or “microdosing” be
used to enhance creativity?

Anecdotal evidence points toward yes. A series
of experiments between 1954 and 1962 involved
nearly 1,000 participants in monitored settings to
gauge any effects from LSD, including artists,
academics, and many others. Some of the results
from those experiments, along with a pilot study in
1966 that tested whether low dose LSD (around 50
micrograms) could aid problem solving, showed trends
of possible enhanced functioning in subjects.
More recently, a team of neuroscientists in London
have been studying LSD’s effects on the brain using
cutting edge imaging technology. Their preliminary
findings are showing support for LSD’s use in
enhancing creativity and problem solving abilities,
as well as making progress toward understanding the
biological mechanisms behind these effects.
Microdosing is a practice that has gained much
interest recently that involves regularly taking doses of
LSD too small to cause noticeable changes in
consciousness (around 5-10 micrograms) to enhance
creativity and problem solving.
Much of the recent attention to LSD microdosing is
owed to James Fadiman, a psychologist who was part
of the LSD problem-solving experiment in the
1960s. In 2015, Rolling Stone magazine published
an article featuring Fadiman and an enthusiastic
advocate from San Francisco’s tech industry on the
regular use of LSD to increase productivity. The
story became part of a widely covered series of reports
in local TV news networks around Silicon Valley, as
well as business and technology magazines like
Forbes and Wired,and most recently even
fashion magazines Marie Claire and Esquire.
Fadiman is conducting an informal study largely based
on anecdotal reports to make the case for a controlled
clinical trial

Yes. Fully legal research programs in the mid-20th
century that involved tens of thousands of patients
found that carefully monitored and controlled use of
LSD may be beneficial for many psychiatric disorders,
personal and spiritual development, and creative
enhancement for healthy people. However, after LSD
was banned in 1970, clinical research to evaluate its
medical safety and efficacy was effectively halted until
the late 90s and early 2000s.
Today, there are more than a dozen studies taking
place to evaluate the medical safety and efficacy of
psychedelics, including LSD. Although much of the
early LSD research did not stand up to today’s
standards, as they often lacked a placebo control
group or double-blinding procedures (in which neither
the subject of the research nor the investigators knew
whether the subject received LSD or placebo).
Nevertheless, their promising findings have been
revisited and spurred a resurgence of new, more
rigorous research on the potential benefits of
psychedelics as a treatment for cluster headache,
anxiety, addiction to alcohol and other drugs,
and depression, as well as neuroimaging
experiments furthering the understanding of its effects
on the brain.

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